Why do I have a pain in my butt??!!

What do we treat the most at Missing Link Physical Therapy??!!!The pain in the butt!!! No, I don’t mean the client, but literally a pain in the butt sometimes referred to as sciatica or piriformis syndrome. Often individuals have difficulty standing, sitting, walking, running or going up stairs. This pain can be very debilitating and decrease function and quality of life. This blog is aimed to address ways to decrease pain and the necessary treatment required in order to regain your mobility and function.

Frequently when a sudden ache in the butt or leg occurs people always wonder, why? Individuals often don’t experience back pain and have not done anything differently to cause this pain. Well, the body is a great machine and was built to be resilient. Very often by the time you experience a particular pain the movement dysfunction has been present for years. It is like eating the wrong foods and years later you have hypertension and heart disease. In the majority of cases we can contribute the cause of the pain to a nerve irritation in the low back or peripheral muscles. For instance, with mild to moderate degrees of nerve irritation to the low back you can get this abnormal tightness and guarding of the hamstring, gluteal (butt) muscles, calf muscles and even heel pain or cramping of the bottom of the foot.

In order to start recovering from this state you need to remove the irritation to the spine. If the condition is acute this can be done by pharmacological means (please refer to your physician for the appropriate drug of choice). From a Physical Therapy disposition this can be done by avoiding certain postures; such as slouched positions, any activity that may place stretch on the hamstring (want to avoid stretching of the hamstring as it will cause stress on the nerve if there is nerve tension), reading in the bed with legs extended…Basically you want to avoid any position that will place stress on the nerve. Imagine a long string that is attached to your spine and extends all the way to your foot, every time you slouch or stretch the hamstring you irritate the nerve. The stretch may feel good initially but you will find that you may suffer a rebound effect of pain later in the day, with even more tightness in the particular muscle. Figure A shows an individual reaching into a box with a rounded back posture; this will increase tension in the back and also the nerve. Figure B shows an individual stretching the hamstring with a rounded back posture, at this time the nerve may be on maximal tension and irritation may be at its greatest. In Figure C the individual to the left is placing increased stress to the back and nerve, the individual to the right is exhibiting good technique with lifting by hinging from the waist and bending the knees.

poor lifting

FigureA

hamstring stretch

Figure B

lifting

Figure C

After decreasing the nerve irritation it is now time to improve the muscle tension. This can be done by getting a deep tissue massage, foam rolling or trigger point dry needling (my recommended treatment of choice). You want to improve the muscle length of the gluteal muscles and back muscles. Figure D, E, F, H represent foam roll massages; these massages should be performed as tolerated, slowly kneading out the trigger points in the respective muscles. Figures G and I represent stretches that can be performed for approximately 45-60 seconds. Please refrain from doing exercises if pain is elicited.

Glute_Max 1

Figure D. Foam roll gluteals

FaomrollTFL

Figure E. Foam roll TFL

foam-roll-low-back

Figure F. Foam roll low back. Be sure to keep back neutral or slightly flexed in order to avoid excessive stress on the low back.

IMG_0357

Figure G. Piriformis stertch

foam roll QL

Figure H. Foam roll quadrates lumborum (side of back).

QL stretch

Figure I. Quadratus lumborum stretch (stretch to side of back)

Last step is to stabilize the spine by avoiding an anterior or posterior pelvic tilt. I recommend stabilization of the lumbar spine with the back in neutral.

Becky2a

Figure J. The picture to the left represents an anterior pelvic tilt. The picture in the middle represents a neutral spine. The picture to the right represents a posterior pelvic tilt.

In this blog I have purposely avoided educating on abdominal stabilization as I believe that the exercise for stabilization should be monitored. The reason individuals have pain in the first place is because of a movement dysfunction, so I highly suggest getting assistance from a trained movement specialist (physical therapist, personal trainer, athletic trainer, pilates instructor, yoga instructor etc.). Pain does not just appear but is comes about due to increased stress being placed on a structure in the body over time. REPAIR THE MOVEMENT AND YOU IMPROVE THE PAIN.

Please take note that in order to have somewhat of a full recovery from this injury you must make sure that you are able to contract the deep abdominals appropriately and work on maintaining the contraction over time with your respective exercise/activity. With practice over time these muscles should contract involuntarily.

Over time if symptoms appear to be unrelenting and worsening we suggest getting further diagnostic testing to determine if there is structural damage such as a disc bulge/ herniation, degenerative changes in the spine, etc. Further medical treatment may be required in order to decrease symptoms prior to initiating an exercise program.

In our clinic we see many of these cases and have been very successful with treatment. We shall be delighted if you call us and schedule an appointment today. I am sure that you want to resolve the nagging pain in your ‘butt’.

You can Contact us at: Phone:703-858-5070, Email: office@missinglinkpt.com, website:www.missinglinkpt.com.

We are located at: 44933 George Washington Blvd Suite 165, Ashburn VA 20147

Advertisements

Are you at Risk for Injury In 2015??!!

Every New Year it is customary for us to make resolutions in order to improve some aspect of our life. Today it is my desire to address the physical resolutions such as losing weight, increasing activity level, participating in a new sport, resuming a sport and/or returning to sports after injury.

In 2015 Missing Link Physical Therapy (MLPT) wants to focus on injury prevention for persons in the community as a whole; from the professional athlete to the 80 year old who likes to participate in recreational activities. As Physical Therapists we have used the techniques of range of motion, strength and sports specific exercises to predict whether individuals are ready to return to their specific sporting activities. However, research reveals that these techniques are not 100% effective and some individuals develop new injuries or have a recurrence of the old injury.  Consequently, it is essential that we perform a Musculoskeletal Physical Assessment that will continue to assess range of motion and  strengthen in addition to the  performance of a Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and Y Balance Testing (YBT).

One might ask: Why is this Physical Assessment important? Research has shown that the right to left asymmetries can lead to abnormal stressors on the body resulting in injury over time. This evaluation enables us to assess asymmetries from right to left, assess the effects of past injuries on the body, and the effects injuries have contributed with regards to motor recruitment/proprioception. Think about the effects of an ankle or knee injury on your body. Wouldn’t it be great to have a test that reveals these imbalances and predicts risk for injuries?

The FMS and YBT are tests that show risk for injury. With regard to the YBT we can predict injuries based on gender, age and the specific sport undertaken by the individual. These tests give the clients an objective result on the risk for injury based on their specific sporting activity.  THIS ASSESSMENT IS PROVIDED AT MLPT.

In the New Year we encourage you to exercise!! Visit MLPT to have your Musculoskeletal Physical Assessment and we shall be happy to guide you towards increased activity/improved performance with decreased risk of injury.

Below are articles to substantiate the testing we are providing:

If you wish to schedule your Physical Assessment please call or email us at (703) 858- 5070; office@missinglinkpt.com